Working on Valentine’s Day Cards

Last night Ian and I worked on his valentines for his daycare class together.  No, we did not do any of the numerous crafty imaginative valentines that I have been pinning all month.

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Like this cute card...

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...or this one.

Instead, we bought a box of Valentine’s Day cards from Walmart when we went grocery shopping on Sunday and those are what we’ll be giving out. 

Did I want to do something grand and creative?  Sure.  But in the big scheme of things… he’s 2.  He’ll have lots more Valentine’s Days ahead of him and plenty of opportunity for clever and fun valentines in the future.  So this time I opted to walk up and down the Walmart aisle and let him pick which of the myriad of boxed valentines he wanted to give his friends.

He ended up chosing valentines that feature “How to Train Your Dragon 2” (he got this movie for Christmas and loves it).  They are your typical kid valentines, where you write the TO and FROM, pop in one of the included temporary tattoos, and seal it closed with a heart sticker.

So then, how in the world does a 2 year old help with valentines if he can’t write or read?  And there’s no crafty handprint or footprint component?  It’s pretty simple (and fun!) to have your toddler help, really.  

• I laid out all the valentines from the box and asked him to pick out one for each of the kids in his class.  Before I could even start reading names (THANK YOU DAYCARE FOR THE LIST!!), he was handing me valentines saying, “This is for Addison” or “This is for Colin”… as he gave them to me, I wrote in the TO and FROM names.  We got through probably 5 valentines this way before Ian stopped.  At this point, instead of waiting for him to grab a valentine and tell me a name, I read a name off the list and prompted him to pick out a valentine.

• Once we got through everyone on the list, and all the TO and FROM names were written, I grabbed a box of crayons.  I wanted Ian to put his mark on the valentines in some way, so I told him to pick a crayon (or more than one) and color around where his name was written.  He picked lime green for some reason, which was really pretty fortunate because the black pen I used to write his name was still 100% visible beneath the coloring scribbles he added.

• When he was done coloring all the valentines, I laid out all the temporary tattoos and told him to pick one to go with each valentine.  We went through the list of names again, and he chose the tattoo he wanted each kid to recieve.  Then I poped them in the holder in each card (which admittedly was a little tricky- they could make the slots a bit easier to access).

• Finally, I asked him to grab a heart sticker off the sticker sheet so we could seal the cards.  He needed a little help with this since the hearts were small, but he was able to peel off all the hearts and hand them to me, and I applied them to each valentine.

The whole endeavor probably took about 30 minutes.  Could I have done his valentines myself in a lot less time?  Definitely.  But we had fun doing them together.  He loved getting to color the valentines and grab the stickers. 

He is so big on helping these days that I take any advantage to let him do just that.  And it made a potentially dull task (writing out valentines for 14 kids and 2 teachers) more exciting.  Plus, if someone asks if he did valentines for his friends, he can proudly say “YES!”  There’s not much better than seeing that look of satisfaction on your kid’s face, and I wouldn’t trade that for anything (not even a beautiful, crafty, pin-worthy valentine).

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